Posts Tagged: gene programs

Myocardial Viability: Survival Mechanisms and Molecular Imaging Targets in Acute and Chronic Ischemia

Myocardial Viability: Survival Mechanisms and Molecular Imaging Targets in Acute and Chronic Ischemia

Henry Gewirtz, Vasken Dilsizian

Diagrammatic representation of myocardial cell and potential targets of radiotracer imaging and mapping of the surface renin–angiotensin system. ACE indicates angiotensin-converting enzyme; AGT, angiotensinogen; Ang II, angiotensin II; AT1R, angiotensin II type 1 receptor; and AT2R, angiotensin II type 2 receptor. Reproduced with permission from Schindler and Dilsizian.61 Copyright © 2012, Elsevier. [Powerpoint File]

Myocardial Viability: Survival Mechanisms and Molecular Imaging Targets in Acute and Chronic Ischemia

Myocardial Viability: Survival Mechanisms and Molecular Imaging Targets in Acute and Chronic Ischemia

Henry Gewirtz, Vasken Dilsizian

Myocyte metabolic pathways outlined for glucose and fatty acid metabolism with focus on the mitochondrion. The electron transport chain (ETC), complexes I–V, is a series of proton pumps. The last of which, complex V, supplies protons to a proton-sensitive ATPase and thereby generates ATP. CPT1,2 indicates carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1,2; FA, fatty acid; PDH, pyruvate dehydrogenase; and TCA, tricarboxylic acid (Krebs cycle). Reproduced with permission from Huss and Kelly.30 Copyright © 2005, American Society for Clinical Investigation. [Powerpoint File]

Myocardial Viability: Survival Mechanisms and Molecular Imaging Targets in Acute and Chronic Ischemia

Myocardial Viability: Survival Mechanisms and Molecular Imaging Targets in Acute and Chronic Ischemia

Henry Gewirtz, Vasken Dilsizian

Key myocyte organelles and ion channels and their function under conditions of ischemia and reperfusion. Ischemia (left panel) causes influx of Ca2+ and decline in pH, both of which, if not severe, facilitate maintenance of closed mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP). On reperfusion (right panel), key events include restoration of physiological pH, burst of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from mitochondria, release of Ca2+ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), and opening of mPTP which results in collapse of its Δψ. Reproduced with permission from Hausenloy and Yellon.27 Copyright © 2013, American Society for Clinical Investigation. [Powerpoint File]