Posts Tagged: extracellular vesicles

Extracellular Vesicles in Angiogenesis

Extracellular Vesicles in Angiogenesis

Dilyana Todorova, Stéphanie Simoncini, Romaric Lacroix, Florence Sabatier, Françoise Dignat-George

Mechanisms involved in the modulation of Angiogenesis by platelet-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs). Platelet-derived EVs contain various growth factors and chemokines that induce proangiogenic signaling in endothelial cell (EC). Spingosine-1-phosphate (S1P1), present on the EV surface, induces PI3K activation and, together with VEGF and bFGF, promotes angiogenesis. The EVs released by platelets stimulate the proangiogenic potential of circulating angiogenic cells by increasing their expression of both membrane molecules and soluble factors. Platelet-derived EVs can inhibit angiogenesis by transferring the p22phox and gp91 subunits of NADPH oxidase and increasing the oxidative stress in EC. ? indicates that the exact content of the EVs is not reported; bFGF, basic fibroblast growth factor; EGF, epidermal growth factor; GM-CSF, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor; HGF, hepatocyte growth factor; NADPH, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate; PI3K, phosphoinositide 3-kinase; RANTES, regulated on activation, normal T-cell–expressed and secreted; ROS, reactive oxygen species; VEGF, vascular endothelial growth factor; and VEGFR, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor. [Powerpoint FIle]

Extracellular Vesicles in Angiogenesis

Extracellular Vesicles in Angiogenesis

Dilyana Todorova, Stéphanie Simoncini, Romaric Lacroix, Florence Sabatier, Françoise Dignat-George

Mechanisms involved in the modulation of Angiogenesis by endothelial cell (EC)–derived extracellular vesicles (EVs). EC release EVs rich in micro-RNA such as miR-214 and miR-126, that are transferred to recipient EC and induce proangiogenic signaling. EVs contain functional matrix metalloproteinases that facilitate angiogenesis through the degradation of components of the extracellular matrix. Dll4 is transferred to EC by the EVs and induces Notch receptor internalization and tip cell formation. EVs bear, at their surface, a tissue factor that interacts with β1 integrin and induces Rac1-ERK1/2-ETS1 signaling, leading to the increased secretion of CCL2. EVs transport the complex uPA/uPAR, which stimulates angiogenesis through plasmin generation. The phosphatidylserine present on the surface of the EVs interacts with CD36 and induces Fyn kinase signaling, which leads to increased oxidative stress and the inhibition of angiogenesis. ATM indicates ataxia telangiectasia mutated; CCl2, chemokine c-c motif ligand 2; Dll4, Delta-like 4; ECM, extracellular matrix; ERK1/2, extracellular signal-related kinase 1 and 2; ETS1, avian erythroblastosis virus E26 homolog-1; IL-3R, interleukin-3 receptor; MMPs, matrix metalloproteinases; NotchR, Notch receptor; PS, phosphatidylserine; Rac1, Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1; ROS, reactive oxygen species; TF, tissue factor; TIMPS, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases; uPA, urokinase plasminogen activator; and uPAR, urokinase plasminogen activator receptor. [Powerpoint File]

Extracellular Vesicles in Cardiovascular Disease: Potential Applications in Diagnosis, Prognosis, and Epidemiology

Extracellular Vesicles in Cardiovascular Disease: Potential Applications in Diagnosis, Prognosis, and Epidemiology

Felix Jansen, Georg Nickenig, Nikos Werner

Extracellular vesicles (EVs) as biomarker in different stages of coronary artery disease. Levels of circulating EVs are detectable in plasma of healthy subjects and are elevated in patients with cardiovascular risk factors or already present cardiovascular diseases. This figure summarizes EV surface markers from clinical studies, which showed increased circulating levels of endothelial-, platelet-, white blood cell–, and red blood cell–derived EVs in different stages of coronary artery disease from patients at risk to acute coronary syndromes (Illustration credit: Ben Smith). [Powerpoint File]

Methodological Guidelines to Study Extracellular Vesicles

Methodological Guidelines to Study Extracellular Vesicles

Frank A.W. Coumans, Alain R. Brisson, Edit I. Buzas, Françoise Dignat-George, Esther E.E. Drees, Samir El-Andaloussi, Costanza Emanueli, Aleksandra Gasecka, An Hendrix, Andrew F. Hill, Romaric Lacroix, Yi Lee, Ton G. van Leeuwen, Nigel Mackman, Imre Mäger, John P. Nolan, Edwin van der Pol, D. Michiel Pegtel, Susmita Sahoo, Pia R.M. Siljander, Guus Sturk, Olivier de Wever, Rienk Nieuwland

Working principle of common methods to isolate extracellular vesicles (EVs). Separation is based on size, density, and immunophenotype. Straight brackets: isolated EVs; yellow: soluble components; and blue: buffer. A, In differential centrifugation, separation is based on size, and large EVs (gray) collect earlier at the bottom of the tube and at lower g forces than small EVs (green). The soluble components are not affected by centrifugation, but non-EV particles such as lipoproteins and protein aggregates may copellet with EVs. B, In density gradient centrifugation, separation is based on density, and EVs will travel to their equilibrium density. Non-EV particles such as lipoproteins may coelute with EVs because of similar density or interaction. The soluble components with a high density relative to the gradient will collect at the bottom of the tube. C, Size exclusion chromatography uses a porous matrix (dotted circles) that separates on size. Soluble components and particles smaller than the size cutoff enter the porous matrix temporarily, whereas EVs and particles larger than the size cutoff do not enter the porous matrix. As a result, EVs and particles larger than the size cutoff elute before the soluble components and particles smaller than the size cut-off. D, In ultrafiltration, soluble proteins and particles smaller than the size cutoff (≈105 kDa) are pushed through the filter, and the EVs are collected at the filter. E, In immunocapture assays, EVs are captured based on their immunophenotype. EVs are captured using an monoclonal antibody (mAb) directed against an antigen exposed on the targeted (green) EVs only. F, In precipitation, addition of a precipitating agent induces clumping of EVs, non-EV particles, and soluble proteins. The clumps will sediment, and sedimentation can be accelerated by centrifugation. [Powerpoint File]